Marie Curie

Recently, as I’ve walked through my town and through London, I’ve seen several people selling yellow daffodils – a symbol for the Marie Curie charity. I thought I’d take a look at what it is they do, the support they provide and how such a phenomenal charity has influenced lives.

The Marie Curie charity logo.
The Marie Curie charity logo.

Marie Curie is a charity which is committed to providing care to everyone based on need, without taking into account their diagnosis [1]. They pride themselves in helping terminally ill people stay at home until the end of their lives, making the process more comfortable for many. They work with hospices, charities and the NHS, reducing the need for emergency hospitalisation and while most importantly benefitting people, they also help to cut hospital costs [1].

The research which Marie Curie undertakes focuses on finding the best ways possible of caring for terminally ill people, and improving their quality of life. This is a goal proven to be increasingly achieved as 99% of patients rated their overall experience as good or very good and 96% said they were involved by the staff as much as they wanted in decisions about their care [1].

Charities such as Marie Curie are so important in caring for terminally ill people, and relieving the NHS of some demand. When one of my best friends mum was being treated for cancer, she had a Macmillan nurse and I know that she supported them all through the process. It is integral to remember that these charities run on donations, and the care they can provide depends on the money donated. Without these funds they cannot function, so it is not enough to just admire a charities work, but important to support it too. They are great for offering help to everyone possible, regardless of age, income, or any other factor. While before I have realised how important these charities are in providing care for many terminally ill people, I did not previously consider the benefits provided to our healthcare system. Next time you see a donation box, please be sure to spare your loose change.

[1] https://www.mariecurie.org.uk/who/our-history [accessed on 12/03/17]

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