Interview with Professor Neil Kennedy

Professor Neil Kennedy is Professor of Paediatric medicine at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital and Malawi College of Medicine in Blantyre, Malawi. He and his family lived over the road from me and my family for 4 years, and he has very kindly answered my questions for this blog.

Me: What’s a typical day like for you?

Professor Kennedy: Long!

0700 – 0800: Office and emails.

0800 – 0900: department handover meeting. We hear what’s gone on the night before, discuss difficult cases

0900 – 1200: ward rounds or clinic work. Here, that means seeing perhaps 40-50 children some mornings. We always have students with us when we work on the wards, so I do a lot of teaching – medical education is an apprenticeship. Most of my clinical work is in general paediatrics, but I have a specialist interest in paediatric cardiology (I run the only kids’ heart clinic in Malawi) and in child protection work.

1200 -1330: lunch (on occasions) or more usually some sort of meeting – a journal club or a university committee

1330 – going home time: varies a lot between teaching, working on research, administrative duties (I’m head of the dept), writing grant proposals or seeing specific sick children.

Me: What’s the biggest challenge that you face at the moment?

Professor Kennedy: Lack of time to do all that needs doing. Government is often out of cash for basic treatments.

Me: What is the most rewarding part of your work?

Professor Kennedy: The amazing variety and the opportunity to make a difference in the lives of the children we see and the wider community. Last week, I met the President as she opened our new centre for abused children. I got a phone call from a mum in Northern Malawi to thank me for getting her child sent to India for life-changing heart surgery. I worked with a donor to gain funds to train another 8 specialist paediatricians for Malawi (we only have 16 now – just over one per 500,000 children!)

I would like to thank Professor Kennedy for his interesting answers to my questions. I hope he inspires you as much as he has inspired me to become a doctor.

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