Stafford Hospital – Day 2

In the morning, we went to see Diagnostic Imaging. First I looked at x-ray pictures of different parts of the body and saw how the image diagnoses illnesses, such as secondary lung cancer, because the tumours show up as small black marks in the lungs. I saw collapsed lungs, joints and fractures and saw how the image can tell you how a patient broke a bone because they fell in a certain way.

Then we had a talk from a nurse about the importance of hand washing and keeping clean in the hospital, to stop people suffering as a result of illness picked up at the hospital. She also showed us the radio substances containing barium or iodine, that patients drink so that images can be taken inside their body, and she showed us catheters and instruments used when operating, such as stents.

Afterwards I went to the general x-ray area where all of the x-rays are done. The nurse showed me how they receive a request form for an x-ray which tells them the area to x-ray; why they need to x-ray that area; and some information to justify why an x-ray will be beneficial to the patient, because there is a risk when an x-ray is taken as it is radioactive and can cause mutations.

She showed us the x-ray rooms and explained how they worked. The nurses told us that if a patient is at risk because they have had a lot of x-rays, a warning flashes up on the screen and they have to question whether an x-ray is actually beneficial or not. We also saw a CT scan which was really interesting to observe.

In the afternoon we went to Critical Care and saw the amazing facilities for the critically ill patients there. There were lots of dialysis machines and ventilators, which most of the patients there relied on. There were trollies ready for emergencies – e.g. one patient’s tube in his trachea came out and he couldn’t breathe so it had to be put back in immediately.  There were also rooms for families to sleep and live in if their relative was critically ill, so they could stay near them in their final days. I also learnt that all of the doctors in Critical Care were anaesthetists, because the patients there were so ill and relied on drugs to keep them alive. There were some alcoholic patients who were suffering withdrawal symptoms and needed full time care and supervision because they could be violent. Lastly, we had an interesting talk from a doctor there who told us about some different specialities and medicine in general.

 

Leave a Reply