Great news which will save a life every 3 seconds

image from http://resultsuk.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/global-fund-logo.gif

I was really excited to read in the news here that Justine Greening, the international development secretary, has announced that the UK will support the Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria over the next three years with a pledge of £1 billion, if the overall target of $15 billion is met from other governments and donors. Barack Obama has promised $1.65 billion for 2014 and Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark and Iceland have each pledged $750 million. Now, other governments like Australia, Canada and Germany will hopefully follow suit and match the UK’s offer.

If they do, it means that the UK will be able to deliver 32 million mosquito nets with the potential to protect over 64 million people (equivalent to the entire UK population) and save a life every 3 seconds. They will also be able to fund lifesaving anti-retroviral therapy for 750,000 people living with HIV and TB treatment for more than a million people. The Global Fund is estimated to have saved more than 8.7 million lives since it was set up.

I am particularly happy about this announcement as I feel I have played a small part in it myself. Back in March this year, I wrote to my MP asking him to ask Justine Greening to increase Britain’s support for the Global Fund. You can read my letter to him here.

I received a reply here and also an invitation from Jeremy Lefroy to go to Westminster to make a presentation to the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases (APPMG), which you can read about here.

I am really proud of the part I have played in this news today, and I hope that one day soon there will be no more malaria in the world.

 

Living Below The Line Press Release by Malaria No More

The other day, Malaria No More sent me this press release that they have written about me and Jeremy Lefroy ‘living below the line’. 

Staffordshire MP and sixth form student live below the poverty line on £1 a day to save lives from malaria

7th May 2013: How much change can you make from £1? This is the question that Jeremy Lefroy, MP for Stafford and Megan Owen, a sixth form student, are asking themselves as they live on a budget of £1 a day for all food and drink for five days.

They are taking part in Live Below the Line – an innovative campaign to fight extreme poverty. It challenges the public to get sponsored to cut their spending on food and drink to just £1 a day. This budget is a daily reality for the 1.4 billion people around the world who are forced to live below the poverty line every day, for absolutely everything.

Jeremy and Megan are doing the challenge in support of Malaria No More UK as they have both experienced the devastating impact of the disease while living in Africa. Jeremy caught malaria twice during his 11 years working with smallholder farmers in Tanzania (1989-2000) and Megan’s brother suffered from malaria when her family spent five years in Malawi (2008 -2012).

This experience shaped their personal and professional directions on returning to the UK. For Megan it has fuelled a keen interest in tropical medicine and she hopes to become a doctor. Jeremy, who was elected to Parliament in 2010 and has retained a strong interest in African issues, he sits on the influential International Development Select Committee and Chairs an active All-Party Parliamentary Group on Malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases. It was in this guise that he invited Megan to speak at a meeting the group organised at the Houses of Parliament to mark World Malaria Day on 25 April. 

Megan says: “I wasn’t sure what to expect when I arrived at the Houses of Parliament, but I was warmly welcomed by Jeremy, and he asked me to speak first. There were many people attending the event, including MPs and global health experts, and the theme of the evening was the World Malaria Day theme: ‘Invest in The Future: Defeat Malaria’.

Jeremy adds: “It was our privilege to welcome Megan. Her own story takes us beyond the statistics and speaks volumes about the daily impact of malaria in Africa. She saw her brother suffer and mercifully recover from malaria thanks to swift treatment. We want this to be the case for families across Africa. No parent should lose a child to a preventable disease that costs £1 to treat”.

Jeremy and Megan have since pledged to Live Below the Line. The challenge is in its third year in the UK, and growing strong with almost 5000 people registered so far, raising over £400,000 for charities, including Malaria No More UK. The charity works tirelessly to save and protect millions of lives from malaria, a preventable disease that remains a leading killer of young children in Africa.

Jeremy is doing the challenge one day a week due to his parliamentary schedule, with one week down and four left to go. He reflects: “I wanted to take the opportunity to experience life with my choices totally curtailed – the daily reality for 1.4 billion people today. The challenge also gives a timely excuse to raise awareness about a cause close to my heart – malaria. It is unacceptable that this preventable disease still claims the life of a child every minute and we need to do all we can to sustain support to save the lives of the most vulnerable”.

Megan completed her challenge during the Live Below the Line week from 29 April – 3 May. She says: “I was really surprised at how much I could get for my money, although I wish I could have afforded more fresh fruit and vegetables. I missed drinking a cup of tea! But the time goes quickly and it is a great opportunity to raise awareness about malaria – a disease that is, not only caused by poverty, but causes poverty”.

Money raised for Malaria No More UK will be used to help save lives in Africa, where most deaths from malaria take place and where the disease is an ongoing contributor to the cycle of poverty, preventing children from going to school and workers from earning a living.

www.livebelowtheline.org.uk

All-Party Parliamentary Group on Malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases

Today I received an email from Susan Dykes, coordinator of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases (APPMG).  Jeremy Lefroy showed her the letter I wrote to him and she has invited me to take part in their World Malaria Day event on 23rd April, in Westminster.

image from http://www.elca.org/~/media/Images/Our%20Faith%20In%20Action/Responding%20to%20the%20World/Malaria/world_malaria_day_2013.jpg

The APPMG hold regular monthly meetings and invite experts in the field of malaria and tropical diseases to talk and debate with parliamentarians, to try to find both urgent and long term solutions to malaria. They also discuss new ideas and new technologies and methods of field work in the battle against malaria and other treatable diseases.

They take evidence from academic, governmental, international agency, charitable, private sector, professional and other people. Each year they publish an annual report of the evidence gathered by the world’s leading professionals, in order to try to eradicate malaria for good. Jeremy Lefroy is the chairman of the APPMG. 

I’m really excited about going and taking part in the event, as I shall not only learn more about what’s being done to prevent malaria, but also meet some interesting people from different fields.

image from http://blogs.elca.org/malaria/files/2012/03/world-malaria-day2.jpg

Letter to Jeremy Lefroy

I have written this letter to my local MP, Jeremy Lefroy, asking for his support in ending malaria. You can Add your voice too, by writing to your local MP. 

Dear Mr Lefroy,

It was really interesting to meet you when I went to Auschwitz last
month, and to hear about your time in Tanzania. As you know, I’m in the
sixth form, after which I’m hoping to study medicine.
I was first inspired to become a doctor after my younger
brother, caught malaria in Malawi. I really admire the doctors
I met out there and the vital work they do, despite the country’s
poverty and difficulties. Now I’m back in England, I’m raising
awareness and money for ‘Malaria No More’, through my blog about my
journey from Malawi to medical school:
http://medblog.medlink-uk.net/megsjourney/.

I think the UK’s commitment to help halve malaria deaths in at least 10
of the world’s most affected countries by 2015 is so important, and I
would love it if, like me, you could support this amazing commitment
and ensure that it’s backed with sufficient funding. My brother was so
lucky; he was fit and healthy and had access to a private hospital
where he was given life-saving treatment, and was able to recover
quickly. Unfortunately, 1500 children are still dying every day from
malaria, even though it’s preventable.

There’s been amazing progress made in the last 10 years, with deaths
from malaria cut by over 25%, but I don’t feel that this is enough.
Although the UK has played a leading role in reducing malaria, if we
don’t do more, then malaria could rapidly rise again. It would be great
if you could join me in calling for action now, to make sure that this
doesn’t happen.

If you could pass this email to the Secretary of State for
International Development, I’d like to ask her to redouble UK efforts
against malaria, including support for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS,
TB and Malaria. It’s already saved almost 9 million lives, but
desperately needs topping up if it’s to continue its vital work.

I believe that defeating malaria would be the greatest humanitarian
achievement of all time, and it is achievable, with enough money and
the right leadership. Ending deaths caused by malaria is very important
to me personally. I know that millions of children die because of the
disease and, without the right care, it could easily have been my
brother.

Thank you for your support,

Megan