Successful Weight Loss Tips

Weight loss can be difficult, so I’m going to give you some tips, confirmed by researchers, to help the weight loss process:

  1. Eat a varied, colourful, nutritionally dense foods – this will reduce the excess intake of saturated fats, thus reducing the risk of diseases such as coronary heart disease
  2. Keep a food and weight diary to keep track of how much weight is being lost – this can act as a reminder to keep eating healthy, and also act as a motivator by tracking your success
  3. Engage in regular physical activity, even if it means doing things like using the stairs instead of the lift, or walk instead of using a car
  4. Eliminate liquid calories as these calories can very easily add up – stick to liquids such as water, tea and coffee
  5. Control your portion sizes as this can help a person to moderate food intake
  6. Eat mindfully and consider whether what you are eating is the right healthy option for you
  7. Try not to eat just because you’re bored, or because you have nothing better to do- try to distract yourself by doing something more beneficial, like going for a walk or meeting with friends
  8. Plan your food for the week beforehand so you are less likely to stray off track and keep junk food in your kitchen
  9. Talk to friends and family to get some motivation and keep on your goal – joining exercise clubs or gaining an exercise partner can be very beneficial
  10. Finally, try and stay positive – weight loss is a gradual and challenging process, it till take time to see results but having a positive mindset can help overcome the barriers and successfully lose weight

Thank you for reading this weeks blog. If you enjoyed it, feel free to share and leave a comment down below!

Thanks,

Rohini

Sources used:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/303409.php?sr

https://www.hindustantimes.com/fitness/5-healthy-diet-mistakes-that-hamper-weight-loss/story-kMrDfd4wD6Xegq33RidQTM.html

Study confirms people can learn while sleeping

Recent research from researchers at the University of Bern in Switzerland has shown that humans can actually learn new information during periods of slow-wave sleep.

Sleep has been shown to stabilise and consolidate memories, as well as embed them in the acquired knowledge store in the brain. Through the use of electroencephalograms, brainwave activity of 41 male and female volunteers was recorded whilst they had a daytime nap.During the nap, the volunteers were made to listen to pairs of words, for example “house” and “tofer”, or “cork” and aryl”.

When the words were repeated at an active phase of slow-wave sleep, the association between the two words was remembered during wakefulness. In addition, the brain areas that are active during wakeful learning were also still working during sleep, so areas such as the hippocampus and language areas.

Thank you for reading this weeks blog. If you enjoyed it, feel free to share and leave a comment down below!

Thanks,

Rohini

Sources used:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324370.php

https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/17140-study-finds-sleeping-in-on-weekends-may-help-you-live-longer

An Amazing Case of Self-Surgery (pt 3)

M. Clever Maldigny was a military surgeon who underwent 5 operations by the age of 27 in order to remove his kidney stones. However, all of the operations caused long-lasting complications, so he decided to remove his sixth stone by himself.

He opened himself up using a mirror and the scars from the previous procedure – the self-surgery ended up being successful and, as said by his friends, “was as tranquil and cheerful as if he had never been a sufferer”.

A few years later, he had a seventh stone appear, however he didn’t take this one out himself. He rather opted for a minimally invasive surgery where the stone was crushed using a small hole.

Thank you for reading this weeks blog. If you enjoyed it, feel free to share and leave a comment down below!

Thanks,

Rohini

Sources used:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324061.php

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/154193.php